Cover image for Alpha beta chowder
Title:
Alpha beta chowder

Michael di Capau books

Michael di Capau books.
Title:
Alpha beta chowder
Personal Author:
Publisher Info:
New York : HarperCollins, c1992.
Physical Description:
unp. : color illustrations
Series:
Michael di Capau books

Michael di Capau books.
Abstract:
Presents an alliterative humorous verse for each letter of the alphabet, including "The Enigmatic Egg, " "Mishmash, " and "Worrywart."

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Status
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E STE Picture Book
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J 811 STE Book Juvenile Nonfiction
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On Order

Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Gr 2 Up-- This zany, appealing alphabet soup provides plenty of poetry for sophisticated palates to ponder and appreciate. Beginning with an exhortation imploring Alexander the cat to eat an axolotl and ending with the sad tale of Zelda's impending demise (she's trapped in a blizzard), Jeanne Steig's witty and wacky verses challenge and amuse. Distinctive, offbeat illustrations by William Steig enhance the humor and provide glimpses of western melodrama, domestic disasters, and (possibly) a murder mystery. Although the vocabulary is undoubtedly difficult (an axolotl is a larval salamander, by the way), Steig's extensive use of alliteration along with the rollicking rhythm and rhyme (and sheer ridiculousness) of her poetry will easily engage the interest of young listeners. Middle school, young adult, and even older readers and listeners will likewise enjoy the Steigs' savory stew. While the immediate audience for this title may be relatively small, the book's appeal is timeless for it is a clever, classic collection of purely pleasurable poetry, sure to spice up any library's shelves. --Lisa Dennis, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

This animated alphabet book, abuzz with crazy characters, brings a crooked charm to the frequent drudgery of learning one's ABCs. Jeanne Steig's verse bubbles merrily along, drolly blending abundant alliterations with downright silliness in a wonderful celebration of language. William Steig's lighthearted illustrations perfectly complement the keen wit while they add depth to the numerous people and animals conjured up in the poetry. From ``Amphibian, avoid thy fate. Slither off! Absquatulate!'' to ``Zelda's fire has fizzled out,'' there is never a dull moment. In addition to their comical content, several verses offer a tongue-twisting tour de force: `` ` 'Twas a year ago yesterday,' yammered the yak, /` That a youth with a yataghan jumped on my back,' '' and all demand to be read out loud. The Steigs have created a splendid collaboration (similar in many respects to their Consider the Lemming ) , a veritable linguistic chowder that invites readers not to sip but to plunge wholeheartedly in. All ages. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Gr. 4-8. Joy in words, their sound and meaning, the more esoteric the better--that's the basis of this collection of mock-heroic nonsense verses. Each verse plays with a letter of the alphabet, glorying in alliteration and assonance, from "Abhorrent axolotl, scat!" to "Toby Twits Tina" and "Exegesis on the Sphinx." One of the best is "Quentin Quails" ("Quick-witted Quentin rode out on a quest"); there's also "Noisome Naomi," whose voice is like a needle. The lines aren't all as good; some of the rhymes are lame, and even the nonsense logic gets lost at times. Steig's pen-and-watercolor illustrations range from sly to wild. As always, his brattish kids wreak havoc with demonic concentration. But it's the facial expressions that are the most telling, whether on the wary cat, the nervy nuisance, or the glowering sphinx that fell asleep exhausted and awakened extinct. (Reviewed Nov 15, 1992)0062050060Hazel Rochman