Cover image for Miss Mary Mack
Title:
Miss Mary Mack

Miss Mary Mack : a hand-clapping rhyme

Sing-along stories

Sing-along stories.
Title:
Miss Mary Mack
Personal Author:
Publisher Info:
Boston : Little, Brown, [1998]
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm.
Series:
Sing-along stories

Sing-along stories.
Abstract:
An expanded adaptation of the familiar hand-clapping rhyme about a young girl and an elephant. Includes music and directions for the hand-clapping actions.

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Status
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E HOB Picture Book
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E HOB Picture Book
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J 398.8 HOBE Book Juvenile Nonfiction
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J 398.8 HOBE Book Juvenile Nonfiction
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J 398.8 HOBE Book Juvenile Nonfiction
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J 398.8 HOBE Book Juvenile Nonfiction
Searching...
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J 398.8 HOBE Book Juvenile Nonfiction
Searching...
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J 398.8 HOBE Book Juvenile Nonfiction
Searching...
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J 398.8 HOBE Book Juvenile Nonfiction
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J 398.8 HOBE Book Juvenile Nonfiction
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On Order

Summary

Summary

ugely popular in both hardcover and board book formats (over 100,000 copies sold), this fun book is now available in a new paperback format. This is an absurdly funny story that children will want to sing, chant, read, and clap to again and again.


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2ÄStarting on the bright, yellow title page showing a smiling elephant ambling his way out of the zoo past the snoring zookeeper, this lively rendition of the well-known song and playground game is filled with new verses and humorous pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations. Miss Mary is a perky young lady who primps at a pink-skirted vanity table while a newspaper touts "Elephant escapes zoo." The additional verses tell a fuller story of Miss Mary, recounting the elephant's exploits after he jumps the fence and lands in a yard filled with Fourth of July picnickers, and the friendship that ensues between him and the girl. The elephant takes more of center stage with each successive illustration, whether he is soaring through the air, his adroitness belying his size, or landing in a yard, creating an elephant-sized craterÄand mess. When the zookeeper finally arrives to retrieve him, Mary begs him to stay, even offering him her silver buttons that soon are no longer down her back but on his trunk. By the end of the story, both Mary and the elephant vault over the fence for 50 cents. This high-flying package of fun, complete with music and hand instructions, will have children clapping along in no time.ÄJane Marino, Scarsdale Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Hands will be clapping and toes will be tapping to this spunky rendition of a favorite school yard rhyme. Most kids‘and grown-ups, too‘will readily recognize the first three stanzas of this comical chant, but after the "elephant, elephant, elephant" jumps the "fence, fence, fence," the mayhem begins. Hoberman (One of Each) has the acrobatic pachyderm literally crashing the backyard barbecue of young Mary Mack‘and sending hot dogs, catsup and guests flying. Despite the mess, Mary Mack grows quite fond of the friendly beast and, with her famous silver buttons, bribes him to stay. Hoberman's lively verses roll off the tongue. Kids will be eager to learn the hand claps and thigh slaps to accompany this rhythmic romp; instructions, along with music notation, appear on the end pages. Westcott (I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly) attacks her latest subject with great verve and her characteristic sweet, silly humor. Three smiling terriers and a cat appear throughout, adding to the rollicking fun. And a tea party scene with Mary Mack and Elephant manages to be both elegant and hilarious. Ages 4-8. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Ages 5^-8. Westcott's cartoonlike illustrations are a great complement to Hoberman's adaptation of a favorite hand-clapping rhyme: "Miss Mary Mack, Mack, Mack / All dressed in black, black, black." The sheer silliness of the pictures will attract an audience: Miss Mary Mack watching as a large purple elephant jumps the fence, helping the beast clean up after it lands with a "bumpy thud, thud, thud," soaring into the sky with the elephant, and finally landing gently thanks to two colorful umbrellas. The rhythm is contagious, and Hoberman uses the front endpapers to picture the clapping routine that inspired the story and to provide simple instructions. Wild fun for story times. --Stephanie Zvirin