Cover image for Poems about anger by America's children
Title:
Poems about anger by America's children

Kids express

Kids express.
Title:
Poems about anger by America's children
Publisher Info:
New York : Benchmark Books, 2002.
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
Series:
Kids express

Kids express.
Abstract:
A collection of poetry and art by children describing their feelings about anger.
Added Author:

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Status
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J 811.008 POEM Book Juvenile Nonfiction
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Summary

Summary

A collection of poetry and art by children describing their feelings about anger.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-5-Two collections of children's original writings and artwork. About two dozen selections in free verse are presented in each book. Anger focuses on youngsters' reactions to being picked on, left out, called names, etc. One of the best is "Punch What You Say," in which a third grader describes dealing with a bully, concluding "-I don't listen and break/free./Now you're not real to me." A few entries are disquieting. For example, part of "Red Hot" reads: "I'm so mad at this kid/I don't like. I/feel like making/him get blown up and/I won't care-." In School, kids tell of the small miseries as well as the joys they experience. One fourth grader uses onomatopoeia effectively to express his frustration with a classmate in "Peter's Pencils." One or two vivid illustrations in a variety of mediums accompany the verses on almost every page; they include crayon drawings, watercolor paintings, collages, etc. Authors and artists are identified underneath each work. The quality of the selections varies-not surprising, considering the different grade levels represented. Some use language and imagery effectively, while a few others make little sense. Many don't seem to qualify as poetry; the arrangement of lines seems arbitrary rather than a result of the work's meter. Others lack meter and when read could just as easily qualify as prose. Still, while none of the entries achieves the beauty of the children's poetry offered in Richard Lewis's The Wind and the Rain (S & S, 1968; o.p.), students will be able to relate to these honest expressions of emotions and may be inspired to create some poetry of their own.-Karey Wehner, formerly at San Francisco Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.