Cover image for Book
Title:
Book
Title:
Book
Personal Author:
Publisher Info:
New York : DK Ink, c1999.
Physical Description:
unp. : col. ill. ; 30 cm.
General Note:
"A Richard Jackson book."
Abstract:
This poem compares a book to a house, a treasure chest, a farm, and a tree full of leaves.
Added Author:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Status
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E LYON Picture Book
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J 811 LYO Book Juvenile Nonfiction
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E LYON Picture Book
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On Order

Summary

Summary

A loved book lifts you -- comforts, excites, entices. Book, in words and paintings, captures the feeling of opening to page one -- for the first or the fiftieth time - and entering the worlds of drama, imagination, and fun promised beyond it. A girl in red flannel pj's reaches toward a panel in the night sky. The panel, one of four, bears a B. Light floods the girl's face, all anticipation, for she is all readers.

And then she is inside, inside the B-O-O-K, words streaming toward her, beckoning, circling her, music in their meaning and their sound A castle, a cave - its walls dancing with wild ponies, one of which joins the girl on her journey -- these are passing wonders on the way to the source. Writer and reader meet "as the gate of the book swings wide, " a culmination caught in a breathtaking sequence of spreads. Look at the girl on the jacket for a hint of how Book feels, a sensory adventure that ends with a benediction: "May it hold you. May it set you free."


Author Notes

George Ella Lyon was born on April 25, 1949, in Harlan, Kentucky. She is an author who has published in many genre, including picture books, poetry, juvenile novels and articles. Her books often take place in Appalachia. She earned her B.A. at Centre College in Kentucky in 1971, her M.A. at the University of Arkansas in 1972 and her PhD at Indiana University - Bloomington in 1978.

She first published in 1983, a poetry collection called Mountain. Aside from publishing, she also taught writing at a number of colleges, including the University of Kentucky, Centre College, Transylvania University, and Radford University. She has also acted as an executive committee member for the Women Writers Conference. She has also taught writing through workshops, conferences, and author visits.

Her titles include Father Time and the Day Boxes, Sonny's House of Spies, Holding on to Zoe, All the Water in the World, With a Hammer for My Heart, and Where I'm From: Where Poems Come From. In 2014 her title Voices from the March on Washington made the Hot Civil Rights Titles List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 4In this short poem, Lyon presents metaphors about books: A BOOK is a HOUSE/that is all windows and doors or a CHEST/that keeps the hearts treasure or a FARM,/its fields sown with words. Catalanottos watercolors show a blond-haired girl moving through the scenarios evoked by the text. Many of the words from the poem are incorporated into the pictures; they swirl around the girl and appear strewn across the sky or floating in the air. This is an earnest effort, but the overall effect is pretentious and unlikely to engage readers of any age. We are better off reading good books to children than trying to describe their effect in picture-book format.Miriam Lang Budin, Mt. Kisco Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

This ambitious but insular picture book attempts to answer the question that appears as if written in chalk just before the title page: "Dear Friend,/ Dear Reader,/ Look at the book/ you have just opened./ What is it/ you hold in your hand?" A series of extended metaphors compares a book to a house in which "light falls/ through the windows of words," to a "CHEST/ that keeps the heart's treasure," and so on. Each of Catalanotto's intricately designed watercolors focuses on a girl who appears literally inside the books she is reading, and each splendid painting is filled with light and energy. When she enters her first book, the girl is surrounded by words and images as diverse as a kokopelli, a cross-sectioned apple and a blue roadster. On other pages, she chases a dappled gray horse that metamorphoses into a bird, or words surround her in varied guises, some like mirror images, some repeating phrases from Lyon's poem. Both text and art are impressive on their own, but they combine less successfully than in previous collaborations between Lyon and Catalanotto (Who Came Down That Road?). The artistic urgency of the illustrations seems at odds with the quiet, invitational tone of the poem; in some moments, too, the art appears to offer an independent narrative, one that competes with rather than enhances the text. The arbitrary elements of some paintings and the occasionally abstruse language ("Reader, you are [the book's] weather:/ your tears, your eyes shining") are likelier to distance children than to enthuse them about reading. It's ironic that this book about the joys of books should feel more like homework than pleasure. Ages 4-7. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Gr. 2^-5, younger for reading aloud. Frequent collaborators Lyon and Catalanotto pair up again to evoke in words and pictures the magic of a book: "A BOOK is a HOUSE / that is all windows and doors." During the course of the story, Lyon uses the metaphors of a tree, a chest, and a farm, and turns the reader into the weather and the writer into the farmer: "Now you meet / as the gate of the book / swings wide." A blonde little girl in red pajamas opens the cover (or is it a door?) of a giant book and steps into the book's world, which is depicted in richly intense watercolors. The writer/farmer is shown with arms outspread, his words shooting out in all directions and curling to wrap around the little girl in a celebration of the connection between author and reader. This will be an especially good choice for using in the classroom to teach writing. --Susan Dove Lempke