Cover image for Maya Angelou
Title:
Maya Angelou

Voices in poetry

Voices in poetry (Mankato, Minn.)
Title:
Maya Angelou
Personal Author:
Publisher Info:
Mankato, MN : Creative Education, 2003.
Physical Description:
pages cm.
Series:
Voices in poetry

Voices in poetry (Mankato, Minn.)
Abstract:
Examines the life and accomplishments of the African American writer, performer, and teacher. Includes a selection of her poetry.
Added Author:

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Status
Searching...
J 811.5 KIR Book Juvenile Nonfiction
Searching...
Searching...
J 811.54 KIRK Book Juvenile Nonfiction
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

These beautifully designed books combine poetry and biography with evocative photos and illustrations to create an inspiring introduction to the lives and works of some of the world's finest poets. "Voices in Poetry celebrates the intricate layers of meaning in the poets' lives--and in our own.


Author Notes

Maya Angelou was born Marguerite Annie Johnson on April 4, 1928 in Saint Louis, Missouri. At the age of 16, she became not only the first black streetcar conductor in San Francisco but the first woman conductor. In the mid-1950s, she toured Europe with a production of the opera Porgy and Bess. In 1957, she recorded her first album, Calypso Lady. In 1958, she became a part of the Harlem Writers Guild in New York and played a queen in The Blacks, an off-Broadway production by French dramatist Jean Genet.

In 1960, she moved to Cairo, where she edited The Arab Observer, an English-language weekly newspaper. The following year, she went to Ghana where she was features editor of The African Review and taught music and drama at the University of Ghana. In 1964, she moved back to the U.S. to become a civil rights activist by helping Malcolm X build his new coalition, the Organization of African American Unity, and became the northern coordinator of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Even though she never went to college, she taught American studies for years at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem. In 1993, she became only the second poet in United States history to write and recite an original poem at a Presidential Inauguration when she read On the Pulse of Morning at President Bill Clinton's Inauguration Ceremony. She wrote numerous books during her lifetime including: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Just Give Me a Cool Drink of Water 'Fore I Die, All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes, Wouldn't Take Nothing for My Journey Now, and Mom and Me and Mom. In 2011, President Barack Obama gave her the Medal of Freedom, the country's highest civilian honor, for her collected works of poetry, fiction and nonfiction.

She appeared in the movie Roots and was nominated for Best Supporting Actress in 1977 for her role in the movie. She also played a part in the movie, How to Make an American Quilt and wrote and produced Afro-Americans in the Arts, a PBS special for which she received a Golden Eagle Award. She was a three-time Grammy winner. She died on May 28, 2014 at the age of 86.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-9-These slim volumes offer objective introductions to the lives and literature of two well-known writers. The appealing formats and brief, informative texts feature one- to two-page, chronologically arranged "chapters," each detailing an important period in the featured figure's life. Alternating with these informational pages are examples of poetry and excerpts from Shakespeare's plays and Angelou's autobiographical writings. In Shakespeare, the text is accompanied by portraits, engravings, title pages, and large tinted photographs of roses by noted Swiss photographer Imsand. Angelou is illustrated with Thompson's finely executed realistic drawings and paintings, most of them in oil pastel; sepia-toned historical photos; and black-and-white photographs. The clearly presented message in each of these books shows that Shakespeare and Angelou have much in common. Although neither acquired a college education, both had the desire and self-assurance to pursue their creative talents. More detailed information about these two poets can be found in Sarah E. King's Maya Angelou: Greeting the Morning (Millbrook, 1994), Diane Stanley and Peter Vennema's Bard of Avon: The Story of William Shakespeare (Morrow, 1992), and Peter Chrisp's Shakespeare (DK, 2002).-Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Reviewed with S. L. Berry's William Carlos Williams. Gr. 5-9. These attractive, picture-book-size biographies in the Voices in Poetry series combine striking visuals, excerpts from the poets' works, and concise, straightforward narratives. Both follow their subjects from childhood through their artistic careers, and each section includes poems that illustrate and expand the biographical information. The unusual images are particularly attention grabbing, beginning with the poets' own handwriting reproduced on each title's cover. Inside, personal photographs mix with reproduced manuscripts and striking illustrations that interpret the poetry without being too literal. Kirkpatrick's text, which defines basic literary terms, seems geared toward a slightly younger audience than Berry's, and both texts are so abbreviated that readers needing research support will find better sources elsewhere. Still, the books offer visually exciting introductions to major American poets for students' browsing and for introductory use in the classroom. Picture and poetry credits are noted, but there is no other documentation. --Gillian Engberg Copyright 2003 Booklist