Cover image for Over the river and through the wood
Title:
Over the river and through the wood

Boy's Thanksgiving Day
Title:
Over the river and through the wood
Publisher Info:
New York : Coward, McCann & Geoghegan, 1974.
Physical Description:
32 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
General Note:
First published in 1844 as The boy's Thanksgiving Day in the 2d vol. of the author's Flowers for children.
Abstract:
Well-known together with lesser-known verses to the traditional Thanksgiving song are illustrated from both Grandmother's and the journeying family's point of view.
Genre:
Added Author:

Available:*

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Call Number
Material Type
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EASY CHIL Picture Book
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E CHIL Picture Book
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EASY Picture Book
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EASY Book
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E CHIL Picture Book
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EASY Picture Book
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JUV 784.624 CHIL Book Juvenile Nonfiction
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J 784.624 CHI Book Juvenile Nonfiction
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E CHIL Picture Book
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EASY Book
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E CHIL Picture Book
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E CHIL Picture Book
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Illustrated version of this classic song, complete with full lyrics and musical notation. A family glides over the snow and through the countryside in a horse drawn sleigh, to visit their grandparents' house for Christmas.


Summary

Illustrated version of this classic song, complete with full lyrics and musical notation. A family glides over the snow and through the countryside in a horse drawn sleigh, to visit their grandparents' house for Christmas.


Author Notes

Lydia Maria Child was born in Medford, Massachusetts on February 11, 1802. She was educated at home, at a local dame school, and at a nearby women's seminary. Her first novel, Hobomok, was published in 1824. Her other novels include The Rebels or Boston before the Revolution, The First Settlers, Philothea, and Romance of the Republic. She wrote advice books including The Frugal Housewife, The Mother's Book, The Little Girl's Own Book, and The Freedmen's Book. She was an abolitionist, women's rights activist, and Indian rights advocate. She wrote books about these causes including An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans, Anti-Slavery Catechism, and An Appeal for the Indians. She was also the author of Over the River and Through the Wood (A Boy's Thanksgiving Day). She died on October 20, 1880.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Lydia Maria Child was born in Medford, Massachusetts on February 11, 1802. She was educated at home, at a local dame school, and at a nearby women's seminary. Her first novel, Hobomok, was published in 1824. Her other novels include The Rebels or Boston before the Revolution, The First Settlers, Philothea, and Romance of the Republic. She wrote advice books including The Frugal Housewife, The Mother's Book, The Little Girl's Own Book, and The Freedmen's Book. She was an abolitionist, women's rights activist, and Indian rights advocate. She wrote books about these causes including An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans, Anti-Slavery Catechism, and An Appeal for the Indians. She was also the author of Over the River and Through the Wood (A Boy's Thanksgiving Day). She died on October 20, 1880.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 6

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 6‘Catrow brings new meaning to the classic words and pastoral images usually connected with Child's poem, written in 1844. In this modern adaptation, two parents, three children, and a cat travel in a minivan through a snowstorm, traffic jam, and a Thanksgiving Day parade to grandfather's house. After leaning out of the car window to get a closer look at a horse, the baby joins the parade by flying‘through the air, in and out of a tuba, onto a giant balloon that collides with an airplane‘and then parachuting with his baby blanket. Catrow gives these zany adventures life and humor with his caricatures featuring exaggerated expressions and different perspectives. The large format will attract young readers, but older children who know a more traditional rendition of this poem will enjoy the contrast with this version even more. The visual appeal of this book just might make it transcend the pumpkin-pie season. Consider shelving this rollicking romp with your picture books to give it more exposure.‘Gale W. Sherman, Pocatello Public Library, ID (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

"Like a Mad magazine satire in both its illustration style and intent," said PW, "this urban take on Child's pastoral ditty pokes fun at tradition." Ages 4-7. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. The familiar Thanksgiving poem set to music gets an exceptionally handsome treatment in Manson's color woodcuts. Written 150 years ago, Child's poem was originally 12 verses, but, like most other versions, this book uses the traditional six. The beautiful two-page spreads depict a nineteenth-century holiday complete with sleighs, sleds, ice skates, and, of course, Grandma's house and pumpkin pie. The detailed art, which is reminiscent of Currier and Ives prints, will get second and third looks, right down to the charming endpapers, on which the music and words appear. (Reviewed Sept. 1, 1993)155858210XIlene Cooper


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 6‘Catrow brings new meaning to the classic words and pastoral images usually connected with Child's poem, written in 1844. In this modern adaptation, two parents, three children, and a cat travel in a minivan through a snowstorm, traffic jam, and a Thanksgiving Day parade to grandfather's house. After leaning out of the car window to get a closer look at a horse, the baby joins the parade by flying‘through the air, in and out of a tuba, onto a giant balloon that collides with an airplane‘and then parachuting with his baby blanket. Catrow gives these zany adventures life and humor with his caricatures featuring exaggerated expressions and different perspectives. The large format will attract young readers, but older children who know a more traditional rendition of this poem will enjoy the contrast with this version even more. The visual appeal of this book just might make it transcend the pumpkin-pie season. Consider shelving this rollicking romp with your picture books to give it more exposure.‘Gale W. Sherman, Pocatello Public Library, ID (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

"Like a Mad magazine satire in both its illustration style and intent," said PW, "this urban take on Child's pastoral ditty pokes fun at tradition." Ages 4-7. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Ages 5-8. The familiar Thanksgiving poem set to music gets an exceptionally handsome treatment in Manson's color woodcuts. Written 150 years ago, Child's poem was originally 12 verses, but, like most other versions, this book uses the traditional six. The beautiful two-page spreads depict a nineteenth-century holiday complete with sleighs, sleds, ice skates, and, of course, Grandma's house and pumpkin pie. The detailed art, which is reminiscent of Currier and Ives prints, will get second and third looks, right down to the charming endpapers, on which the music and words appear. (Reviewed Sept. 1, 1993)155858210XIlene Cooper