Cover image for Liar, liar, pants on fire
Title:
Liar, liar, pants on fire
Title:
Liar, liar, pants on fire
Personal Author:
Publisher Info:
New York : Scholastic/Chronicle Books, c2003.
Physical Description:
[32] pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm.
Abstract:
Gilbert is nervous about portraying George Washington in front of the class, and he feels even worse when he leaves his main prop at home and allows another student to take the blame.

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E DEGR Picture Book
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E DEG Picture Book
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E DEGR Picture Book
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Summary

Summary

This story, featuring Gilbert the beloved opossum, is a wise and funny tale of truth and liesand butterflies!that's a perfect tie-in for President's Day, Independence Day, and school units on biography.


Author Notes

Diane deGroat received a BFA in commercial art from the Pratt Institute in 1969. She designed the first basic reading series for Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, before becoming a free-lancer in 1972. She has worked on advertising, editorial, and design projects, but her main focus has been children's book illustration.

She is the illustrator of more than 130 children's books and has worked with Eve Bunting, Lois Lowry, Johanna Hurwitz, and Dr. Ruth. She is also the author-illustrator of the Gilbert and Friends series and the Annie Pitts series. Her picture book Roses are Pink, Your Feet Really Stink was an IRA-CBC Children's Choice and State Children's Book Award winner in Arkansas and North Carolina.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-When Gilbert the opossum takes on the part of George Washington in a play about the cherry tree, he is determined to do a good job. "I cannot tell a lie," he practices continuously, but his mother explains, "Sometimes it's better to say nothing than to hurt people's feelings." And when he borrows the hat from his costume to practice at home and forgets to bring it back, he is quick to blurt out, "I didn't take it!" only to be caught in the lie. DeGroat creatively weaves a story around truth and lies and accompanies it with bright colorful illustrations of the animals that make up Gilbert's class. This entertaining tale provides good discussion material and should be a winner at storytime.-Anne Knickerbocker, formerly at Cedar Brook Elementary School, Houston, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

When Gilbert is cast as George Washington in the school play, he takes the maxim "I cannot tell a lie," a little too far. According to PW, "This sprightly story delivers a clear moral in a gentle voice." Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

K^-Gr. 2. Okay, so the story of George Washington's cutting down the cherry tree has been proven more hagiography than biography, but this story, in which Gilbert the opossum plays Washington in the familiar incident, is so much fun allowances can be made. Gilbert isn't crazy about his role; he would prefer to be the tree so he doesn't blow any lines. Against the rules, he brings his Washington hat home to better practice his part, but he goes overboard with the story's signature line, as when his mother feeds him a new soup: "I cannot tell a lie. I don't like it." The next day he forgets to bring the hat back, and he implies Philip took it. He then gets a good lesson in the importance of telling the truth (and another in forgiveness, from Philip) that brings the story full circle. Fans of previous books about Gilbert, such as Trick or Treat, Smell My Feet (1998), will appreciate Gilbert's return, and new readers will be drawn right in by the humorous text, the sprightly art with its all-animal cast, and the message that peeks through the fun. --Ilene Cooper