Cover image for Mole's hill : a woodland tale
Title:
Mole's hill : a woodland tale
Title:
Mole's hill : a woodland tale
Personal Author:
Publisher Info:
San Diego, CA : Harcourt Brace, c1994.
Physical Description:
unp. : color illustrations
Abstract:
When Fox tells Mole she must move out of her tunnel to make way for a new path, Mole finds an ingenious way to save her home.

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Summary

Summary

Mole loves her burrow near the pond. It's safe and cozy underground, and best of all--it's home. So when Fox says Mole has to move her home to make room for a new path, she must do some quick thinking--and digging--to save it. "Ehlert's collages, inspired by the Woodland Indians' traditional arts of ribbon appliqué and beadwork, are bold; graphically striking; and rich in form, shape, and color. Perfect for young children, this is an admirable marriage of text and art."-- School Library Journal


Author Notes

Lois Ehlert was born November 9, 1934, in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. She is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, and the Layton School of Art. She has also worked as an art teacher, freelance illustrator, and designer. Her work as an author and an illustrator has appeared in countless publications and has received numerous awards and honors.

In addition to creating books, Ehlert has produced toys, games, clothes for children, posters, brochures, catalogs, and banners. She has received the Caldecott Honor Book, 1989, for Color Zoo, a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year for Snowballs, the Booklist Editors' Choice for Cuckoo/Cucú: A Mexican Folktale/Un Cuento Folklórico Mexicano, the IRA Teachers' Choice and NCTE Notable Children's Trade Book in the Language Arts for Feathers for Lunch, the American Library Association Notable Children's Book and Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor Award for Chicka Chicka Boom Boom.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-The creator of the acclaimed Moon Rope (Harcourt, 1992) has taken a fragment of a Seneca tale and provided gorgeous, full-page illustrations to accompany her simple text. Fox, Skunk, and Raccoon order Mole to move because her mound of dirt blocks their path to the pond. Clever Mole spends the summer building up and beautifying the hill above her underground network of tunnels, and by fall it is too large to move. Instead, Fox asks her to dig a tunnel through it, which, of course, she is happy to do. Ehlert's collages, inspired by the Woodland Indians' traditional arts of ribbon appliqué and beadwork, are bold; graphically striking; and rich in form, shape, and color. Perfect for young children, this is an admirable marriage of text and art.-Cyrisse Jaffee, formerly at Newton Public Schools, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

"Ehlert achieves dazzling effects with simple geometric shapes and strong, pure hues," said PW in a starred review. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Booklist Review

Ages 3-7. When Fox finds a mole hill inconveniently placed along his path to the pond, he informs Mole that she must make way. Raccoon advises her, "Better listen to Fox--he's got big teeth." Unwilling to move, Mole plants seeds on her hill. Months later, her beautiful flowers win over the other animals, convincing them to preserve her hill. When Fox asks her to dig a tunnel so that other animals can go through the hill, she agrees. Broad, double-page spreads feature collages of bright, bold shapes against solid backgrounds. Most of the colorful, collage papers are stippled. Notes at the end of the book tell that the story derives from a fragment of a Seneca tale and is set in Wisconsin, with indigenous flora and fauna. As with Ehlert's other books, the artwork reflects careful research and a strong eye for shape and color. Although the book is visually dynamic, the storytelling lacks tension. Still, Ehlert's fans, as well as teachers seeking simple picture books based on Native American tales, will want to consider this one. ~--Carolyn Phelan