Cover image for The boy who was raised by librarians
Title:
The boy who was raised by librarians
Title:
The boy who was raised by librarians
Personal Author:
Publisher Info:
Atlanta, GA : Peachtree, c2007.
Physical Description:
1 volumes (unp.) : color illustrations ; 26 cm.
Abstract:
Melvin discovers that the public library is the place where he can find just about anything--including three librarians who help in his quest for knowledge.
Added Author:

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Summary

Summary

This humorous tale of a curious young boy and his single-minded quest for knowledge is a heartfelt and affectionate tribute to librarians everywhere.

Every day after school Melvin goes to the library. Everything has its place in the library and Melvin likes it that way. And his favorite people--Marge, Betty, and Leola--are always in their places, behind the reference desk.

When something interests Melvin, his librarian friends help him find lots and lots of books on the subject. When he collects creepy bugs in a jar, they help him identify, classify, and catalog the insects. When he is cast as the Enormous Eggplant in the school play, Betty reads aloud from Organic Gardening to help him find his motivation. As the years pass, Melvin can always find the answers to his questions--and a lot of fun--in the library. Then one day he goes off to college to learn new things and read new books. Will he leave the library and his friends behind forever?

Readers will enjoy Brad Sneed's delightful illustrations that colorfully capture the fun-loving spirit of Carla Morris's story about the contagious enthusiasm of learning.


Author Notes

Carla Morris is the children's librarian at the Provo City Library in Utah. This is her first book.

Brad Sneed has illustrated almost twenty picture books, some of which he has also written. His titles include Deputy Harvey and the Ant Cow Caper; Aesop's Fables; and When Wishes Were Horses. He lives in Kansas.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Young Melvin spends his free time at the library. Three librarians, Marge, Leeola, and Betty, become his family--always happy to see him, help with his homework, and share his interests, even when it means Melvin's bugs escape their jar, and creepy crawlers invade the Livingston Public Library. Time passes, and the librarians help Melvin win a spelling bee; in high school, he takes a job as a page. When he goes to college, he misses his friends. In a heartwarming ending, another little boy comes to the library with questions, and Melvin is the new librarian, ready to help. Morris, a librarian herself, has clearly seen kids whose real home is the library, but it is rather unsettling that neither parents nor caretakers are ever mentioned. That said, this effectively shows the solid bond that can develop between librarians and their young patrons. Sneed's artwork, full of interesting perspectives, neatly personalizes the women, even if Melvin does look a bit nerdy. Overall, this paean to librarians will be nice to have on hand. --Ilene Cooper Copyright 2007 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-Little Melvin loves his library, and his librarians-Marge, Leeola, and Betty-are his very favorite people. As he grows up, they help him learn about his world and explore all kinds of things. And when Melvin finishes college, he chooses to join the noble ranks of their profession and help other children learn wonderful things just like he did. Morris is-you guessed it-a children's librarian herself, and her enthusiasm for the field permeates her narrative. But it's Sneed's animated, startlingly accurate depictions of contemporary libraries that make the story engaging. Librarians will also recognize other, less prominent details incorporated into the background, like the covers of several Caldecott Award-winning picture books, successfully rendered in miniature with just a few deft brushstrokes of watercolor. Morris delivers a quaint story, but Sneed makes it possible for readers to smell the very bindings of the books and hear the shuffle of feet across the carpeted floor. This title will be a surefire hit with librarians; whether or not it will also appeal to children is more difficult to predict.-Catherine Threadgill, Charleston County Public Library, SC (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.