Cover image for Rosie Revere, engineer
Title:
Rosie Revere, engineer
Title:
Rosie Revere, engineer
Personal Author:
Publisher Info:
New York : Abrams Books for Young Readers, c2013.

New York : Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2013.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm.
Abstract:
A young aspiring engineer must first conquer her fear of failure.
Added Author:

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Summary

Summary

Rosie may seem quiet during the day, but at night she's a brilliant inventor of gizmos and gadgets who dreams of becoming a great engineer. When her great-great-aunt Rose (Rosie the Riveter) comes for a visit and mentions her one unfinished goal--to fly--Rosie sets to work building a contraption to make her aunt's dream come true. But when her contraption doesn't fly but rather hovers for a moment and then crashes, Rosie deems the invention a failure. On the contrary, Aunt Rose insists that Rosie's contraption was a raging success: you can only truly fail, she explains, if you quit.
From the powerhouse author-illustrator team of Iggy Peck, Architect comes Rosie Revere, Engineer , another charming, witty picture book about believing in yourself and pursuing your passion.

Praise for Rosie Revere, Engineer "Comically detailed mixed-media illustrations that keep the mood light and emphasize Rosie's creativity at every turn." -- Publishers Weekly

"The detritus of Rosie's collections is fascinating, from broken dolls and stuffed animals to nails, tools, pencils, old lamps and possibly an erector set. And cheddar-cheese spray."
-- Kirkus Reviews

"This celebration of creativity and perseverance is told through rhyming text, which gives momentum and steady pacing to a story, consistent with the celebration of its heroine, Rosie. She's an imaginative thinker who hides her light under a bushel (well, really, the bed) after being laughed at for one of her inventions."
-- Booklist

Award
2013 Parents' Choice Award - GOLD
2014 Amelia Bloomer Project List
ReadBoston's Best Read Aloud Book
 


Author Notes

Andrea Beaty is the author of When Giants Come to Play; Iggy Peck, Architect; Doctor Ted; and the mid-grade novel Cicada Summer. As a kid, she spent her days being a detective, world explorer, movie star, and spy. Now, as a children's author, she spends her days pretty much the same way! Along with children's authors Julia Durango and Carolyn Crimi, she reviews funny books for kids at the website www.ThreeSillyChicks.com. Her title Rosie Revere, Engineer made The New York Times Best Seller List for 2013. She made the list again in 2016 with her title Ada Twist, Scientist.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-By day, Rosie is the quietest, shyest student in her second grade class. But by night, she's a blossoming engineer, combining any spare parts and junk she can find into inventions of her own design. Her great-, great-aunt Rose is really Rosie the Riveter, and as she regales Rosie with stories of her airplane-building days, she shares her greatest dream: to one day fly. So Rosie designs a helicopter for Aunt Rose-but during its maiden voyage, it crashes. When Rosie hears Aunt Rose laughing, she's about to give up, but Aunt Rose encourages her to look at the big picture: before the copter crashed, it flew! Together, they spend all day improving the copter, underscoring that the only true failure comes when you quit. Instrumental background music dips and swells to match the highs and lows of Rosie's engineering adventures. Narrator Rachel L. Jacobs uses different voices for Rosie and Aunt Rose, and the story is complemented by the sounds of switches, wheels, and fans as Rosie tinkers with all of her gadgets and gizmos. A historical endnote describes women's groundbreaking contributions during World War II. The gently animated pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations stand out against bright white backgrounds, and viewers will love spotting the castoffs Rosie recycles into her inventions. VERDICT This production will tie in nicely with STEM units, reminding students to have confidence in themselves and that sometimes the biggest breakthroughs come from embracing failure and revising original plans.-Anne Bozievich, Friendship Elementary School, Glen Rock, PA © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Beaty and Roberts return to the themes (and second-grade classroom) of 2007's Iggy Peck, Architect to revel in the talents and insecurities of one of his classmates. Rosie Revere loves nothing more than to create Rube Goldberg-worthy contraptions during the wee hours of the morning. But an earlier incident has sapped Rosie's self-confidence: after she created a quirky snake-deterring hat for a beloved zookeeper uncle, his response was devastating: "He laughed till he wheezed and his eyes filled with tears,/ all to the horror of Rosie Revere." It takes a visit from another enterprising family member to restore Rosie's faith in herself. The book's message-that the unthinking words and actions of adults can have a chilling effect on children-is an important one, though Beaty hammers it a bit hard in her singsong rhymes. Luckily, Roberts compensates with comically detailed mixed-media illustrations that keep the mood light and emphasize Rosie's creativity at every turn. To wit, in Rosie's version of using every part of the buffalo, she doesn't let a single baby doll appendage go to waste. Ages 5-up. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

This celebration of creativity and perseverance is told through rhyming text, which gives momentum and steady pacing to a story, consistent with the celebration of its heroine, Rosie. She's an imaginative thinker who hides her light under a bushel (well, really, the bed) after being laughed at for one of her inventions. Then she finds encouragement from a great-great aunt whose laughter is a celebration rather than a judgment. The pairing of the wisdom of an older woman and the enthusiasm of a young girl works beautifully. Roberts' colorful watercolor and pen-and-ink illustrations, overflowing with debris, gadgets, and inventions like helium pants, are as lively as the text and Rosie herself. The graph papers on the cover and end pages are reminders that creativity requires deliberate thought (Rosie's aunt gives her a notebook before they begin each invention). A historical note at the back of the book connects Rosie to her namesake, Rosie the Riveter, with her slogan, We can do it! Young readers will already be convinced.--Ching, Edie Copyright 2010 Booklist