Cover image for The rest of us just live here
Title:
The rest of us just live here
Title:
The rest of us just live here
Edition:
First U.S. edition.
Publisher Info:
New York, NY : HarperTeen, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, [2015]
Physical Description:
317 pages ; 22 cm
Abstract:
What if you aren't the Chosen One? The one who's supposed to fight the zombies, or the soul-eating ghosts, or whatever the heck this new thing is, with the blue lights and the death? What if you're like Mikey? Who just wants to graduate and go to prom and maybe finally work up the courage to ask Henna out before someone goes and blows up the high school. Again. Because sometimes there are problems bigger than this week's end of the world, and sometimes you just have to find the extraordinary in your ordinary life. Even if your best friend is worshipped by mountain lions.

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Summary

Summary

A new YA novel from novelist Patrick Ness, author of the Carnegie Medal- and Kate Greenaway Medal-winning A Monster Calls and the critically acclaimed Chaos Walking trilogy, The Rest of Us Just Live Here is a bold and irreverent novel that powerfully reminds us that there are many different types of remarkable.

What if you aren't the Chosen One? The one who's supposed to fight the zombies, or the soul-eating ghosts, or whatever the heck this new thing is, with the blue lights and the death?

What if you're like Mikey? Who just wants to graduate and go to prom and maybe finally work up the courage to ask Henna out before someone goes and blows up the high school. Again.

Because sometimes there are problems bigger than this week's end of the world, and sometimes you just have to find the extraordinary in your ordinary life.

Even if your best friend is worshipped by mountain lions.


Author Notes

Patrick Ness was born on October 17, 1971 near Fort Belvoir, Virginia. He studied English Literature and is a graduate of the University of Southern California. He was a corporate writer before moving to London in 1999. He taught creative writing at Oxford University and is a literary critic and reviewer for the Guardian and other major newspapers. He is the author of eight novels including The Rest of Us Just Live Here and a short story collection entitled Topics About Which I Know Nothing. His young adult novels include the Chaos Walking trilogy, More Than This, and Monsters of Men, which won the Carnegie Medal. A Monster Calls won the Kate Greenaway Medal for illustration, the Carnegie Medal, and was made into a movie and released in October 2016.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Publisher's Weekly Review

Having written both exquisite fantasies and heartbreaking contemporary stories, Ness (More Than This) forays into satire, and mostly succeeds, poking fun at the Chosen One trope-imagine a novel about Bella and Edward's classmates wrestling with exams, college admission, and unrequited love, with all those vampire/werewolf shenanigans as backdrop. Siblings Mikey and Melinda know something sinister is happening when the "indie kids" start dying in mysterious ways. Zombie deer and eerie blue pillars of light suggest apocalypse (again) in their remote town in Washington State, but they are busy trying to survive familial dysfunction (their father is an alcoholic, their mother a power-hungry politician) that has worsened Mikey's anxiety and given Mel an eating disorder. Their diverse circle of friends includes Henna (Mikey's crush) and Jared who is (secretly) part god. Each chapter opens with an ominous (and hilarious) synopsis about the imminent showdown between the Immortals and the hipster clique, and while the payoff after all the supernatural and emotional buildup is minimal, this is Mikey's story to tell and he's not trying to save the world, just himself. Ages 14-up. (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Mikey and his pals are about to graduate high school, right as the indie kids that group with the cool-geek haircuts and the thrift shop clothes start disappearing. It's not the first time this has happened: over his 18 years, Mikey's watched as the indie kids (they're always the Chosen Ones) battled the undead, defeated vampire suitors, and engaged in other world-saving activities. It's run-of-the-mill stuff at his high school, which has been blown up more than once. But right now, Mikey, perfectly normal, not-superpowered Mikey, has more pressing, if prosaic, things to worry about in the little time he has left before college namely, getting cozy with beautiful Henna, connecting with his sister, dealing with his paralyzing anxiety, and hanging with his best friend, who happens to be a God of Cats. Best-selling Ness has crafted a polished, lifelike world where the mundane moments are just as captivating as the extraordinary. Mikey and his friends are flawed, funny, and deeply human, yet the challenges they face mental illness, family trouble, jealousies, etc. are just as meaningful as the apocalypse-prevention the indie kids get up to. Ness' deadpan sci-fi novel pokes fun at far-fetched futuristic fantasies while emphasizing the important victories of merely living. This memorable, moving, and often hilarious read is sure to be a hit. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: You don't have to have superpowers to recognize Ness' cachet in the YA scene.--Walters Wright, Lexi Copyright 2015 Booklist


School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-In this highly satiric exploration of the "chosen one" genre, an incredibly normal group of friends are approaching the end of high school and their parting of ways. Mikey is just trying to get through the year and hopefully ask his longtime crush to the prom. Similarly, each person in Mikey's close-knit circle of friends is battling a myriad of highly relatable issues: jealousy, various insecurities, and dysfunctional family relationships. The beginning of each chapter also contains an update in the concurrent story line centering on the "indie kids." These are Mikey and his pals' extraordinary peers, those from exceptional families who are exclusively chosen whenever there is a supernatural occurrence. They've fought off zombies and fallen in love with vampires, and now they're being targeted by the Immortals, a mysterious group looking for a permanent Vessel. In the end, Mikey and his friends come to grips with the ways in which they are both ordinary and extraordinary. This is a highly ambitious novel with an original concept, and the five main characters are all dealing with issues that will resonate with teens. Though the two plotlines don't always come together and readers used to more linear narratives might feel bombarded by information, the stream-of-consciousness narrative will please fans of Libba Bray's Going Bovine (Delacorte, 2009). VERDICT Fans of madcap humor and satire and those seeking more thought-provoking alternatives to the usual fare will appreciate this unique and clever take on a familiar trope.-Sunnie Lovelace, Wallingford Public Library, CT © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.