Cover image for Snail & Worm : three stories about two friends
Title:
Snail & Worm : three stories about two friends

Snail & Worm three stories about two friends

Snail and worm

3 stories about 2 friends
Title:
Snail & Worm : three stories about two friends
Publisher Info:
New York : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, 2016.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unnumbered pages) : illustrations ; 23 cm
General Note:
A junior library guild selection.
Abstract:
Snail and Worm are best friends who support each other during a silly game of tag, through Snail's adventure up a flower stalk, and when Worm's pet goes missing.

Available:*

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E KUG Picture Book
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E KUGL Picture Book
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E KUGL Picture Book
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E KUGLER New or Popular Picture Book
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Combining deceptively simple art with clever wordplay, Snail and Worm --told in three comical, episodic shorts and ranging in topic from adventuring to having pets--will have both girls and boys delighting in the friends' silly antics, making it a perfect book for readers transitioning between picture books and chapter books.


Author Notes


Author-illustrator Tina Kugler lives in the Los Angeles area with her artist husband and three sons. When she is not making picture books, she can be found trying to befriend snails and worms in her backyard.
www.tinakugler.squarespace.com
Twitter: @tinatheatre
Instagram: @kuglertina
"


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 1-A friend is good to have, but a best friend is even better. Snail and Worm are best buds in the tradition of Arnold Lobel's Frog and Toad or Mo Willems's Elephant and Piggie. The pair have three silly adventures that are sure to please any young reader. Worm goes along with Snail's antics as they play tag with a rock named Bob and Ann the stick. When Snail is determined to climb a flower, Worm is there to cheer him on every step of the way. In the final story, Worm has lost his pet and describes what it looks like to his friend. Snail is positive that Worm's lost pet is a spider. The ending is humorous to all readers. This is a good choice for children not yet ready for early chapter books. The text is not too difficult, nor is it overwhelming. The speech for each character is written in different colors to make it easier to distinguish who is talking. Some of the humor may need to be explained to younger children, but it also makes this book enjoyable. The acrylic illustrations are simple, straightforward, and uncluttered. The characters have great expressions and are animated. VERDICT This appealing easy reader is a must-have for most collections.-Barbara Spiri, Southborough Library, MA © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Two new friends-neither, let's say, in danger of winning a MacArthur Genius Grant anytime soon-star in three cheerfully screwy stories from Kügler (In Mary's Garden). In the first, Worm meets Snail while the gastropod is playing tag with a rock. "I win! I am fast. You are slow," Snail taunts the immobile rock, its eyestalks almost seeming to cheer in delight. Snail scales a tall flower in the equally funny second story, reveling in the amazing views while ignoring that its weight has caused the flower to bend down to the ground. "Wow! They look like ants down there!" Snail raves, staring at actual ants. "Wow! I can see my house!" Snail adds, looking at the shell affixed to its body. The friends show off their pets in the third story-a dog Snail thinks is a spider and a spider believed to be a dog. Snail and Worm's direct, simplified dialogue is perfect for beginning readers, and their unabashed dopiness-equally evident in their conversations and in Kügler's mixed-media cartoons-delivers a steady stream of laughs. Ages 6-9. Agent: Teresa Kietlinski, Prospect Agency. (May) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

When Snail meets Worm, Snail has been blithely playing with his friends Bob and Anne, a rock and stick, respectively. Happily, Worm isn't bothered by Snail's inanimate buddies and joins right in. Next, Snail wants to climb a very tall flower. Like a good buddy, Worm cheers him on all the way to the top. Readers will be tickled when they see where Snail ends up, particularly when he looks back at his shell and exclaims, I can see my house! In the closing vignette, Worm describes his big, furry, brown pet, but Snail thinks it sounds like a scary spider. Kügler's cartoonish creatures, rendered simply in thin lines and soft colors, each have comically googly eyes and cheery expressions, which add plenty of fun visual punchlines and context clues to the short, direct sentences making up the easy-to-read text. Thanks to Kügler's large-format illustrations, early readers should handily pick up on the gently humorous miscommunications between Snail and Worm. The heartening message about accepting a friend's quirks is a cozy bonus.--Hunter, Sarah Copyright 2016 Booklist