Cover image for Brave enough for two
Title:
Brave enough for two

Brave enough for too

Brave enough for to

Brave enough for 2

A Hoot & Olive story

Hoot & Olive story

Hoot and Olive story
Title:
Brave enough for two
Edition:
First edition.
Publisher Info:
New York, NY : Henry Holt and Company, [2018]
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Series:
Hoot & Olive story

Hoot and Olive story
Abstract:
Hoot loves adventures. Olive does not. But as long as they're together, they can accomplish anything.

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Status
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E VOSS New or Popular Picture Book
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EASY VOSS New or Popular Picture Book
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Fans of Winnie the Pooh and Christopher Robin, George and Martha, and Frog and Todd are sure to fall for best friends Hoot & Olive in Jonathan Voss's winning author-illustrator debut.Filled with bold, captivating illustrations, Brave Enough for Two is a touching story about a girl, her imaginary owl friend, and the warm, supportive friendship they share. Jonathan's sweet story is sure to appeal to any child who counts a stuffed animal as a close friend. But the star of the show is Jonathan's sumptuous art, which brings to mind the work of the Fan Brothers and Lauren Castillo.


Author Notes

Jonathan D. Voss was a portrait artist and graphic designer before becoming a children's book illustrator. Winnie: The True Story of the Bear Who Inspired Winnie-the-Pooh by Sally Walker was his first book. Brave Enough for Two is his author-illustrator debut. He lives in North Carolina with his family. Visit his website at jonathandvoss.com.


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Hoot, a stuffed owl, and Olive, a winsome and messy-haired girl, are best friends. Olive likes to experience adventures from the safety of her window seat, her nose in a book. Hoot prefers the real thing and promises to be brave enough for them both. "We can never be lost so long as I'm here and you're there, and here and there aren't very far apart," he tells the wary child. A simple balloon ride turns frightening during a rainstorm, ending safely as Hoot unties the helium balloons one at a time to ensure a soft landing. But a ride down the river scares them both, and Hoot feels defeated when he discovers a hole in his covering, and some stuffing leaking out. Now it is time for Olive to be brave enough for two, and end their adventure tucked into bed with a book. Voss's digitally colored pen-and-ink watercolor paintings are soft and lovely, with half-page smudgy thumbnail pencil drawings a sort of storyboard for the narrative. The language is similarly soft and lovely, and a bit Milnesque: "The pair rolled out, head over bottom, into a patch of grass." It's only natural that Voss's characters share a Pooh and Christopher Robin relationship; he is the illustrator of Sally Walker's 2015 title that tells the story of the real Winnie the Pooh. VERDICT The cover calls this a "Hoot & Olive Story,"suggesting there are more to come. Find room for this kind and gentle friendship story in most collections; perfect for one-on-one and small group sharing.-Lisa Lehmuller, Paul Cuffee Maritime Charter School, Providence © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Olive is a little girl who, when it comes to adventure, prefers "the kind found in books." But her best friend, a stuffed owl named Hoot, promises her that he is "brave enough for both of us" and convinces her to come along on an escapade that starts with hot-air ballooning (powered by a multitude of birthday balloons) and ends on the high seas, with the balloon's basket as the boat. In his author-illustrator debut, Voss (illustrator of Sally Walker's Winnie: The True Story of the Bear Who Inspired Winnie-the-Pooh) tells a supportive story of friendship and taking chances, illustrated in burnished-toned compositions that take on a cinematic expansiveness. Hoot's initial gallantry and protectiveness is sweet ("We can never be lost," he says, "As long as I'm here and you're there, and here and there aren't very far apart"), but in the end, it's Olive who proves to be the steadfastly brave one: "I was afraid today .But you were brave. And you kept me safe," says Hoot. "Don't ever be afraid," Olive replies, "I'll always keep you safe." Ages 4-8. Agent: Catherine Drayton, InkWell Management. (June) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.