Cover image for Fairy spell : how two girls convinced the world that fairies are real
Title:
Fairy spell : how two girls convinced the world that fairies are real

How two girls convinced the world that fairies are real
Title:
Fairy spell : how two girls convinced the world that fairies are real
Publisher Info:
New York, New York : Clarion Books, an imprint of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company, [2018]
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm
General Note:
"1627718"--Back cover.
Abstract:
The true story of British cousins who fooled the world for more than 60 years with a remarkable hoax: photographs of real fairies. Exquisitely illustrated with art by Eliza Wheeler as well as the original photos taken by the girls.
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J 398.45 NOBL New or Popluar Book Juv Nonfiction
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Summary

Summary

The true story of British cousins who fooled the world for more than 60 years with a remarkable hoax, photographs of "real" fairies. Exquisitely illustrated with art by Eliza Wheeler as well as the original photos taken by the girls.

In 1917, in Cottingley, England, a girl named Elsie took a picture of her younger cousin, Frances. Also in the photo was a group of fairies, fairies that the girls insisted were real. Through a remarkable set of circumstances, that photograph and the ones that followed came to be widely believed as evidence of real fairies. It was not until 1983 that the girls, then late in life, confessed that the Cottingley Fairies were a hoax. Their take is an extraordinary slice of history, from a time when anything in a photograph was assumed to be fact and it was possible to trick an eager public into believing something magical. Exquisitely illustrated with art and the original fairy photographs.


Author Notes


Marc Tyler Nobleman writes books for all ages. His titles include Thirty Minutes Over Oregon: A Japanese Pilot's World War II Story , Fairy Spell: How Two Girls Convinced the World That Fairies Are Real , Boys of Steel: The Creators of Superman , and Bill the Boy Wonder: The Secret Co-Creator of Batman, which inspired both the Hulu feature documentary Batman & Bill and a TED Talk. Follow him on Twitter @MarcTNobleman and on Instragram @mtnobleman.


Eliza Wheeler has illustrated several picture books including Miss Maple's Seeds , which she also wrote and which debuted on the NYT bestseller list, and Wherever You Go , written by Pat Zietlow Miller, a Crystal Kite winner. She lives in Los Angeles, California. Visit her online at wheelerstudio.com, and on Twitter and Instagram at @WheelerStudio.


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Gr 2-4-In 1917, two English cousins named Elsie and Francis claimed to have seen fairies in the woods near their home. When their parents refused to believe them, they took their father's brand-new camera to photograph the fae. For the next several decades, this "proof" sparked intrigue and debate about whether fairies were real, or if the girls had pulled off an ingenious deception. Nobleman's text is a rich overview of this bizarre historical controversy; he deftly navigates topics like childhood in the early 20th century, the media and the influence of celebrity culture, and the history of photography, without ever weighing down the central narrative. Wheeler's illustrations are colorful and evocative and effectively propel the action of the story forward through the decades it covers. They also combine seamlessly with the actual photographs, which are included in the text, enabling readers to examine the images for themselves. VERDICT A strong nonfiction choice that manages to present the actual events and illustrate more broadly the 20th century.-Maryanne Olson, Queens Borough Public Library, NY © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Nobleman (Boys of Steel) resurrects the story of an early 20th-century hoax that pulled the wool over the eyes of many Britons, including Arthur Conan Doyle. Cousins Frances Griffiths and Elise Wright copied elaborate drawings of female dancers in flowing garb from a book, then photographed themselves outdoors with these "sprites." After Doyle published the photos, alongside his article about fairies, in a popular magazine, "everyone was aflutter.... Some readers saw it as a historic discovery, others thought the photos were fake." Silent on the subject for decades, the two women later confessed their deception, albeit leaving one mysterious photo up for debate. An inviting layout combines Wheeler's delicately styled ink-and-watercolor illustrations with archival images of the girls' photographs and an excerpt from Doyle's article. The willowy pranksters, a pale woodland palette, and butterfly-dotted skies match the English fairy-tale setting. This recounting of a fanciful, enchanting fraud will leave younger children guessing until the end, and many more readers will embrace the suspension of disbelief, a phenomenon Frances ascribed to the British believers of that day: "They wanted to be taken in." Ages 4-7. Illustrator's agent: Jennifer Rofé, Andrea Brown Literary. (Apr.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

In early twentieth-century England, cousins Elsie and Frances stoked nationwide belief in the impossible: fairies. With a bubbling beck in the backyard of their Cottingley, England, estate, the girls spent the summer of 1917 exploring. And though Elsie and Frances often returned home with dreamy accounts of their fay companions, Elsie's father remained unconvinced. Then the girls snagged one irrefutable photo and another. In the first and best-known snapshot, teensy sprites prance before an unfazed, flower-crown-adorned Frances. Soon, word of the girls' photographs caught the attention of supernatural specialist Edward Gardner, Sherlock Holmes creator Arthur Conan Doyle, and England's popular Strand Magazine. But just how did Elsie and Frances do it? No spoilers here. While Nobleman's (The Chupacabra Ate the Candelabra, 2017) chronological narrative, a seamless blend of both frolics and facts, fuels suspense, Wheeler's ethereal watercolor-and-ink illustrations expertly fold the girls' famous photos and original Strand articles into a world of lush countrysides and unstoppable whimsy. Part accidental trickster tale, part unforgettable fairy tale, all true, this will have kids reaching for cameras of their own in no time.--Shemroske, Briana Copyright 2018 Booklist