Cover image for Chicken talk
Title:
Chicken talk

Chickentalk
Title:
Chicken talk
Edition:
First edition.
Publisher Info:
New York, NY : Katherine Tegen Books, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, 2019.
Physical Description:
32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Abstract:
"From Newbery Medalist MacLachlan and "New York Times"-bestselling illustrator Krosoczka comes a cheeky and heartwarming picture book about chickens who scratch messages around the farm for their humans to find--resulting in surprise, chaos, and plenty of fun."-- publisher's description.
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E MACL New or Popular Picture Book
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E MAC New or Popular Picture Book
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E MACL New or Popular Picture Book
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E MACL New or Popular Picture Book
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Summary

Summary

The chickens on the farm have a message for their farm owners! They're tired of arugula salad, how about putting a fan in their hot coop, and HEY--watch out for that snake in your tent.

As the children walk around their beloved farm, they discover more and more chicken talk scratched into the dirt. The family can hardly believe it. What will the chickens possibly say next!?

With beautiful watercolor illustrations from New York Times bestseller Jarrett J. Krosoczka and heartwarming text by Newbery Medal-winning author Patricia MacLachlan, Chicken Talk is the perfect book to chuckle over, whether you live in the city or the country.

Gather your family around for a delightful tale of surprise, chaos, and barnyard fun in Chicken Talk!


Author Notes

Patricia MacLachlan was born in Cheyenne, Wyoming on March 3, 1938. She received a B.A. from the University of Connecticut in 1962 and taught English at a junior high school until 1979. She began writing picture books and novels at the age of thirty-five. Her works include The Facts and Fictions of Minna Pratt, Skylark, Caleb's Story, Grandfather's Dance, Three Names, All the Places to Love, Before You Came, Cat Talk, and Snowflakes Fall. She won the Golden Kite Award for Arthur, for the Very First Time and the 1986 Newbery Medal for Sarah, Plain and Tall.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 2-Farmer Otis, his wife, Abby, and their children, Willie and Belle, are surprised when their 12 chickens begin writing them messages. The family, extremely fond of their chickens, name them, feed them arugula, and let them roam free. Willie and Belle even allow them to peer into their books when they read outdoors. Then one day, messages start appearing: "No more arugula" and "More stories about brave chickens." The messages, sometimes containing reversals of the letter "e," seem to be written by the chickens. When one message rebukes Tripp, the mail carrier, for his fast driving, the disbelieving postal worker decides to camp out that night to discover the truth. The evening's events convince him of the chickens' authorship (though a remark by Willie might lead readers to think otherwise) and he spreads the word. Egg sales take off, and even more messages appear. The large watercolor illustrations, many of them spreads, contain a great deal of humor. The chickens are filled with personality, offering sideways glances, eye rolls, and perplexed or scolding expressions. In one amusing scene, three white hens sit on porch chairs "like elegant ladies." A chicken's-eye view shows a hen, Trixie, seeming to have a confrontation with Otis, only the farmer's boot and pants leg visible. VERDICT This story, suitable for group sharing, will engage readers and could lead to a hunt for clues about the true source of the messages.-Marianne Saccardi, Children's Literature Consultant, Cambridge, MA © Copyright 2019. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

A farmer and his family have 12 beloved chickens, among them seven hens named Joyce. The whole group listens avidly during readaloud time, and the hens "sometimes sat on the porch chairs and looked out over the meadow like elegant ladies." Then a message appears in the dirt: "No more arugula." Willie and Belle, the farmer's children, ponder the mystery. "Only the chickens eat arugula," Willie points out, and a hen named Trixie gives the kids a pointed look. Their parents, Otis and Abby, are quick to believe: "I thought Trixie liked arugula," Abby says. The birds' messages develop from there, with one request for "more stories about brave chickens" and a growing retinue of bystanders clamoring after eggs and chicken talk both. The story isn't complete, though, until every chicken gets a voice of its own. Artwork by Krosoczka (Hey, Kiddo) uses softly sketched lines and gentle farmyard hues to provide a sense of the farm's peace and the chickens' cleverness. MacLachlan (My Father's Words) offers droll dialogue, a bucolic setting, and a spirited defense of animals as distinct beings with unacknowledged powers of observation. Ages 4-8. (Jan.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Booklist Review

Farmer Otis and his family love their chickens. They have 11: the colorful ones, Trixie, Grace, Bitsy, and Boo; and 7 more white hens, all named Joyce. The family writes each hen's name on their eggs as they collect them the neighbors have favorites. One day, after her usual arugula salad, Trixie has something to say: NO MORE ARUGULA she writes in the dirt. Over the next few days, Willie and Belle, the farmer's children, find more chicken talk scrawled in the dirt, words that grow increasingly demanding and finally culminate in seven statements, all along the same lines: Too many Joyces! Children will love suggesting names for the Joyces (though the Joyces have plenty of suggestions of their own), as they speculate what the chickens will write next. The multimedia, cartoon illustrations using India ink and brushes fill the spreads with color and character, as each chicken and human strut across the pages.--Lolly Gepson Copyright 2018 Booklist