Cover image for I think you're wrong (but I'm listening) : a guide to grace-filled political conversations
Title:
I think you're wrong (but I'm listening) : a guide to grace-filled political conversations

I think you are wrong (but I am listening)

Guide to grace-filled political conversations
Title:
I think you're wrong (but I'm listening) : a guide to grace-filled political conversations
Publisher Info:
Nashville, Tennessee : Thomas Nelson, 2019.
Physical Description:
[224] pages ; 20 cm
Abstract:
"Two friends on opposite sides of the aisle provide a practical guide to grace-filled political conversation while challenging readers to put relationship before policy and understanding before argument. More than ever, politics seems driven by conflict and anger. People sitting together in pews every Sunday have started to feel like strangers, loved ones at the dinner table like enemies. Sarah Stewart Holland and Beth Silvers say there is a better way. As working moms on opposite ends of the political spectrum and hosts of a fast-growing politics podcast, Holland and Silvers have learned how to practice engaging conversation while disagreeing. In I Think You're Wrong (But I'm Listening), they share principles on how to give grace and be vulnerable when discussing issues that affect families, churches, the country, and the world. In this urgently needed new book, they provide practical tools to move past frustration and into productive dialogue, emphasizing that faith should inform the way people engage more than it does the outcome of that engagement."-- Provided by publisher.
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261.70 HOLL New or Popular Book Adult Nonfiction
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Summary

Summary

"Sarah and Beth are an absolute gift to our culture right now. Not only do they offer balanced perspectives from each political ideology, but they teach us how to dialogue well, without sacri­ficing our humanity."

--Jen Hatmaker, New York Times bestselling author, speaker, and founder of Legacy Collective

"Sarah from the left and Beth from the right serve as our guides through conflict and complexity, delivering us into connection. I wish every person living in the United States would read this compelling book, from the youngest voter to those holding the highest office."

--Emily P. Freeman, Wall Street Journal bestselling author of Simply Tuesday and The Next Right Thing

More than ever, politics seems driven by conflict and anger. People sitting together in pews every Sunday have started to feel like strangers, loved ones at the dinner table like enemies. Toxic political dialogue, hate-filled rants on social media, and agenda-driven news stories have become the new norm. It's exhausting, and it's too much.

In I Think You're Wrong (But I'm Listening), two working moms from opposite ends of the political spectrum contend that there is a better way. They believe that we can

choose to respect the dignity of every person, choose to recognize that issues are nuanced and can't be reduced to political talking points, choose to listen in order to understand, choose gentleness and patience.

Sarah from the left and Beth from the right invite those looking for something better than the status quo to pull up a chair and listen to the principles, insights, and practical tools they have learned hosting their fast-growing podcast Pantsuit Politics. As impossible as it might seem, people from opposing political perspectives truly can have calm, grace-­filled conversations with one another--by putting relationship before policy and understanding before argument.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Holland, a former Hillary Clinton campaign staffer, and Silvers, a life and business coach, provide ways for Christians to respectfully engage in political discussions in this instructive guide. The authors, sorority sisters who both attended Transylvania University in Kentucky, began engaging in public Facebook discussions about politics in the aftermath of the 2016 presidential campaign. Holland took a very liberal stance, whereas Silvers is a conservative. Expanding on those discussions, the authors ask readers "to hear each other's thoughts, to test our own beliefs against each other's philosophies, and to better appreciate our own core beliefs by having to articulate and challenge those beliefs." Most of the book sticks to this point and doesn't touch on the underlying disagreements that sparked the authors' initial discussion. This feels like a missed opportunity, especially given their claim that people often spout opinions without researching the facts behind their stances. When the authors do delve into politics, such as in their examination of the history of welfare, they powerfully demonstrate what gracefilled political discussions can look like. Holland and Silvers remind readers that Christian identity doesn't necessarily determine political affiliation. (Feb.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Library Journal Review

This much-needed book from business coach Holland and city commissioner -Silvers (Paducah, KY) arrives at a time when many families and friends find themselves on opposite sides of the aisle when discussing political issues. The authors share how to give grace and be vulnerable when addressing topics that affect families and communities. They offer exercises and reflections for keeping conversations productive and flowing as well as unpack the reasons why we feel the way we do-our deeper values and concerns-to assist in honing future conversations around hot-button subjects. VERDICT A must-read and relevant text for anyone talking about today's politics. © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.